Skip to content Skip to navigation

Highly Qualified

FAQ: 

Do deaf ed teachers have to be highly qualified in every subject they teach?

A special education (deaf education) teacher who delivers direct instruction to students with disabilities in core academic subject areas must meet the appropriate state special education certification requirements for the grade level that he or she is teaching in addition to meeting the same standard for subject matter competency for highly qualified teacher requirements. These requirements apply whether a special education teacher provides direct core academic instruction in a regular classroom, in a resource room, or in another nontraditional setting (for example, homebound or hospital setting). 

 

If a student with disabilities receives instruction in the core academic subject area from an NCLB highly qualified general education teacher and the special education teacher provides direct assistance (tutoring, reinforcement of content, etc.), the special education teacher does not have to meet the highly qualified criteria. However, if the special education teacher is responsible for or shares responsibility for providing direct instruction in a core academic subject area, the design and delivery of instruction, and evaluation of student performance, then the special education teacher must meet the highly qualified criteria. 

2014-15 Student Attendance Accounting Handbook pp 140-141

 

The DHH EC-12 test doesn’t demonstrate subject matter competency in any subject!

Do teachers have to pass the TASC to become certified as a deaf ed teacher?

All teachers who seek certification to teach in a signed communication classroom must pass the TASC. Persons who seek to teach in a classroom where other communication methods are primarily used are not required to pass the TASC for certification; however, they may be required to pass the test for assignment purposes.

http://cms.texes-ets.org/tasc/certificationrequirements/

 

A teacher in an assignment for Teacher of Students with Auditory Impairments is not required to pass the Texas Assessment of Sign Communication (TASC) or the Texas Assessment of Sign Communication-American Sign Language (TASC-ASL) in order to be assigned to a classroom in which another communication method is used predominately. If this teacher completes certification requirements through a State Board for Educator Certification-approved educator preparation program in Texas, the program must have assessed proficiency in the communication method and verified it to be at an appropriate level.

19 TAC §231.619(c) 

Where can I learn more?